Collective Bargaining Agreement Eu Law

Collective bargaining covers all negotiations between trade unions and employers with a view to defining conditions of work and employment, including issues relating to wages and working hours, and the regulation of relations between employers and workers, as set out in ILO Convention 154. Read more According to a recent study, about six out of ten workers in the European Union are currently involved in collective bargaining. However, this coverage is not distributed equitably among all countries. When a company in Europe has a collective agreement, it must comply with everything that is stated in that treaty. Otherwise, the company will open up to financial and regulatory penalties if the conditions are not met – and could also suffer significant damage to its reputation. National wage bargaining institutions are essential to achieving wage outcomes that contribute to increased employment and economic growth. On the basis of a large amount of empirical macroeconomic data from various sources, the Eurofound report on remuneration in Europe analyses, in different wage bargaining systems, how the institutional characteristics of national wage bargaining systems influence wage outcomes. Collective bargaining covers all negotiations between trade unions and employers with a view to defining conditions of work and employment, including issues relating to wages and working hours, and the regulation of relations between employers and workers, as set out in ILO Convention 154. A number of dimensions of collective bargaining (« bargaining structure ») have been identified.

These include coverage, which relates to the percentage of employees directly affected by the agreements; the level of negotiation; the extent or range of issues covered by the negotiation; and depth is the extent to which agreements are implemented and verified jointly. Eurofound collects information at national level on collective bargaining in the EU through its network of Eurofound correspondents. Read more In three countries, collective bargaining coverage has declined sharply in recent years and each case is the result of legislative changes in the bargaining structure. However, in countries such as Norway and Spain, tariff coverage is between 50 and 75%. Slovenia is at the bottom of the list, with coverage in the country increasing from 96% in 2005 to 65% today. This newsletter contains up-to-date information on the development of collective bargaining across Europe. The aim is to facilitate the exchange of information between trade unions and to support the work of the ETUC Collective Bargaining Committee. The Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (Article 156 TFEU) provides that the Commission shall encourage cooperation between Member States and facilitate the coordination of its actions in all areas of social policy, in particular on matters relating, inter alia, to collective bargaining between employers and workers.

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